Domboshava Rocks is a Zimbabwean resort located thirty-five kilometres outside of Harare.

Domboshava Rocks
Dombo3.jpg
Balancing Rocks

Contents

Background

The Domboshava Rocks are popular for their color (grey) from which they derive their name in the local shona vernacular. The rocks are a towering site which make for very good sightseeing.Domboshava Rocks is located north east of Harare. It is an easy and interesting drive as you pass through a village with lots of stalls and produce on sale. Proceeding through the village you will start to see massive granite formations of rock which is the popular Domboshava rocks that attracts many locals and tourists alike, it is a natural history site. It is not that well sign posted so look out for a sign on your right if you are coming out of town which says “Ndambakurmwa – Chiyereswa”this is where you must turn and then there is just a short drive from the main road.

At the base of the granite rocks there are curios, arts and crafts being sold, then in the thatched rondeval you can learn all about the history of Domboshava, and where you need to pay a nominal fee to proceed. The best way to the top of the rock is well sign posted with white arrows which directs you to have a look at the well known rock paintings as well, before reaching the summit of the rock.

It is a great outing for the whole family, either take a picnic breakfast or snacks up for sunset and enjoy a sundowner while admiring the spectacular three hundred and sixty degree surrounding views.[1]

Notable Features

The rocks are quite an imposing site which are ideal for climbing. Once atop, the rocks also offer a great view of the surrounding environment.[2] At the bottom of the rocks, there are also some rock paintings scattered across the rock surfaces.

Gallery

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References

  1. #visitzimbabwe. August 16, 2017 http://www.zimbabwetourism.net/index.php/tour/domboshava/. Retrieved October 26, 2017.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  2. Domboshava, Sundowners, Published: No Date Given, Retrieved: April 2, 2015