Abraham Dumisani Maraire was a Zimbabwean musician, producer and music teacher. He specialised in the mbira and a variation called nyunga nyunga. The mbira is a traditional music in Zimbabwe.

Dumisani Maraire
Dumisani Maraire, Zimbabwean Musician
Dumisani Maraire
Born Abraham Dumisani Maraire
December 27, 1944
Mutare, Zimbabwe
Died November 25, 1999 (aged 54)
Zimbabwe
Cause of death Stroke
Nationality Zimbabwean
Education Doctrate in Ethnomusicology
Alma mater University of Washington
Occupation
  • Musician
  • Music Producer
  • Mbira player
Known for Teaching Music
Children Chiwoniso Maraire, Draze, Tendai Maraire
Website www.thedrazeexperience.com

Contents

Background

Maraire was born in Mutare. He moved to the US in the 60s and started teaching music from 1968 through 1972 at the University of Washington in Seattle, especially the mbira and marimba instruments. In the US he had his children, Tendai Maraire, and Dumi Maraire Jr.He was also the father to the late chiwoniso Maraire

Music

Maraire taught and performed Shona marimba music, nyunga nyunga mbira, singing, drumming, and dance in Seattle from 1968 to 1982 and from 1986 to 1990. [1]

In 1968, the Ethnomusicology Division of the University of Washington hired the talented young Maraire as a Visiting Artist. Dumi taught at the UW for 5 years, and continued to reside in Seattle until 1982, teaching hundreds of people to play Zimbabwean music. Dumi's marimba ensembles became renowned throughout much of the Northwest, performing at fairs and festivals, in schools and clubs, and releasing several albums.

In 1990, Maraire earned his Doctorate from the UW School of Music and returned home to teach at the University of Zimbabwe in Harare.

Maraire is credited for his contribution to music in Seattle and North America in general.[2]

Discography

Death

Maraire died on 25 November 1999 in Zimbabwe after suffering a stroke.




References

  1. Dumisami Maraire , bertdekkers, Retrieved: 1 Dec 2016
  2. 50 Most Influential Musicians, Seattle Met, Published: 12 September 2008, Retrieved: 1 Dec 2016