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Simbi Mubako was a liberation war fighter and the first Minister of Justice and Constitutional Affairs in independent Zimbabwe

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Background

Mubako, Simbi was born on April 20, 1936 in Zaka. His parents are Paul Vuta and Serudzai Mubako.[1] He was amrried to the late Dr Hazel Mubako and together they had four chilcdren Takawira, Revai, Pfumo and Pepukai.[1]

Education

Mubako attended the University of South Africa, University College, Dublin, London School of Economics and Harvard University.[1]

Career

He was a lecturer in Laws, University of Zambia 1970-1976, University of Southampton 1977-1979. Professor, and Dean of Law, University of Lesotho 1979-1980. Minister of Justice and Constitutional Affairs 1980-1984. of Home Affairs 1984-1985, of National Supplies 1985-1990, of State for Regional and Institute Organization Coordination since 1990.[1]


Former Cabinet minister, High Court judge and diplomat, Professor Simbi Mubako, was appointed professor at the Midlands State University's Faculty of Law in September 2006.[1]


Biometric Voting Sentiments

Ambassador Simbi Mubako headed a joint election observer mission of Comesa, EAC and IGAD monitoring those elections.When asked how the BVR system impacted the elections in Kenya works he indicated that

Well, it’s a system that is supposed to facilitate the identification of voters. In other words, it captures the biometrics. The system would produce the data about the person instantly without the delays that occur when you do it manually. In Kenya they introduced this biometric system and we were happy. We thought it would make things easier for everybody, things would go quicker and we would not need to worry much about cheating and so on.

But as it turned out, there were many problems. To start with, in many outlying districts the system didn’t work at all. It didn’t work partly because there was no electricity. If you have no power, then of course, your system cannot work and if it doesn’t work just a little bit, it means the whole system has to be discarded.

So, in the end, the system had to revert to manual voter identification and everything. That was a setback. Then you had groups which lost the election blaming everything on the system, saying that the system itself cannot be trusted.

That, if it happens in the middle of the election, is a major setback. We all felt it would have been better not to have started on the BVR system at all because they hadn’t given it enough time to see that it works.

If they had, it would have been quite easy to see that many of their outstations did not have the infrastructure that is required to be able to operate the system. If you don’t have electricity you can’t use it.

It is very important that things are done in time and properly. It’s up to the people that are organising the elections to decide when to do it, how to do it and when to finish the process. I wouldn’t be able to tell you what kind of timeframe is needed.[1]





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References

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