Mitchell Jambo is a Zimbabwean musician. He is one of the few surviving former members of the Sungura Boys. Jambo released Ndini Uyo, which, at 25 minutes, was the longest sungura track ever produced.

Mitchell Jambo
Born October 17, 1960
Dandazi, Hurungwe
Occupation
Known for Being a musician.

Contents

Background

He was born on 17 October 1960 in an area called Dandzi in Hurungwe, Mashonaland West Province in Zimbabwe. He is the second born in a family of 10 children.

Career

He began his career in music in 1984 when he joined Sungura Boys which was led by the late John Chibadura. He started working as a door man but was promoted to a backing vocalist. He worked with this group for a year before he left in 1985 when he went to the newly formed band Shika Shika Brothers. He then joined the Zimbabwe Cha Cha Cha Kings led by the late David Dick Ziome in February 1985. They recorded their first album in June 1985. This group operated until the year 2001. He then formed my own group Marunga bothers which he named after his own totem.

Jambo worked with different sungura musicians before relocating to South Africa in late 2000.[1]

Hitting hard times

News publications reported that Jambo had hit hard times and was making a living from selling discs at a flea market in Thohoyandou, an administrative centre of Vhembe District Municipality and Thulamela Local Municipality, Limpopo Province in South Africa.[1]

In an interview with The Standard, Jambo denied selling CDs and insisted he was still playing music. Said Jambo:

I am not selling any CDs, but I am still playing music and doing shows.

The musician was not keen to talk about his current life, but when quizzed further, he referred questions to one Joseph Soza, who he said is a guitarist with his band. Soza’s phone was unreachable.[2]



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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Mitchell Jambo sings the blues, Herald, published: January 22, 2013, retrieved: August 18, 2017
  2. Mitchell Jambo falls on hard times, Standard, published: October 4, 2015, retrieved: August 18, 2017