Andy Brown and The Storm
The Storm was a band formed by the late Andy Brown who was known as Muzukuru in 1989. Brown had left Illanga deciding to launch his solo career and it was then that he formed The Storm as an upcoming band in the country. The band has released ten albums up to date and has toured the world performing alongside prominent and iconic musicians such as Salif Keita. The band's music does not fit a particular genre because the band uses many instruments ranging from guitars, mbira, keyboards. The band has however been defunct, this became visible even when Brown was still alive. The population at large began to associate Brown and his band as being affiliated to one of the most prominent political parties in Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe African National Union Patriotic Front ZANU PF. The band however released popular hits such as 'Tichangoshaina', 'Daisy', 'Tomato Sauce', 'Chigaro Chamambo', 'Mawerekongonya' amongst others.

Contents

Background

In 1989, Brown was the first Illanga band member who decided to go solo. He formed his band, The Storm which was more or less like an upcoming band in need to draw attention.[1] It was only after Brown and his band won the Road to Fame competition in 1989 which was hosted at club Hideout 99 in November 1989. The Storm ousted 35 other upcoming bands.[1] Following the triumphant victory of the band, the band was secured a recording contract at Gramma Records.[1] The band then released its first album in 1989 titled The Storm, named after the band.[2]

The recording of the band's first album brought the band seemed to have failed to bring the band into limelight. In the next two years, the band had released two album. It follows that Brown decided to take a break and he left the country for South Africa, in a bid to up his performance.[1]

Post 1991 era

Between 1991 and 1995, Brown was in South Africa and his band was literally defunct. In the later part of 1995, Brown returned back from South Africa and he together with his band released an album. From 1995 up to 2005, the band was consistent in releasing albums which usually carried popular hits which were gained popularity in the country. It was during the same period that the band toured the world, singing in France, the United States of America and the band also performed thrice at the Arts Alive Festival in South Africa.[1]

During and after the Third Chimurenga, Brown, the leading front man of The Storm was implicated as being much more affiliated to the Robert Mugabe's led regime. This costed the band its support base. It became widely known that the band was defunct as it thus began to fail to record albums.

When Brown died on 16 March 2012, the band was still existing but its vibrancy was now limited. It was one of the most favoured bands which usually performed at the galas held in the country which were in most cases spearheaded by the Mugabe led government such as the Unity Gala, Mzee Biras and so forth. When Brown died, his wife Nadine Brown took the reins of the band.

Within four months, the band had toured many parts of the country. The band was however reported to have been disbanded as a result of family feuds between Nadine and Brown's daughter Ammara Brown.[3] Nadine was also said to have decided to leave The Storm to join Mic Inity.[3] As up to now the band no longer exist intact.

Prominent band members

The late Chiwoniso Maraire, Mandy Chibindi, Adam Chisvo, Keith Farquharson, Sam Mataure, Ian Hillman (who is now in Germany), Ammara Brown, Alex Brown

Discography

  1. 1989 The Storm
  2. 1990 Chimvuramabhwe
  3. 1991 Feed Me
  4. 1995 Gondwanaland
  5. 1996 Let The Children
  6. 1997 Tigere
  7. 1998 Harare
  8. 1999 Hondo YeSadza
  9. 2001 Tongogara
  10. 2005 Chiedza [4]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Andy Brown, "New Zimbabwe",published:11 Dec 2009:,retrived:18 June 2014"
  2. Fred Zindi, Remembering Andy Brown, "The Herald",published:17 Mar 2014:,retrived:18 June 2014"
  3. 3.0 3.1 , Andy Browns Storm Disbands, "The Herald",published:7 Feb 2013:,retrived:18 June 2014"
  4. , Andy Brown, "World Music Central", :,retrived:18 June 2014"